Mozilla & Firefox Market Share

This is a super-long post, so I’ll start with the punchlines:

  • We think there are at least 125,000,000 Firefox users in the world right now, give or take. That represents a doubling since Firefox 2 was released a little over a year ago, and significant growth in every country.
  • At Mozilla we view market share as an important quantitative metric that can help us ask smarter questions and build better products, but it’s only one of many
  • We have systems here that tell us approximate number of daily users, and use that information to inform much of what we do.

This is the first of many posts that I’d like to write (and see others write) about the data that we’re seeing about how people use the web. I’ll come back to some of the basic concepts frequently, as they’re building blocks for some of the ways we look at the world.

One of the most interesting things about Mozilla is figuring out how we’re doing, and where to focus and spend time. We look at many indicators; some of the most important are things like the health of addons.mozilla.org, the volume and quality of community contributions to our platform and products, and the vitality of Mozilla-related discussions in the blogosphere. 2 other more numerical indicators that we track are Firefox market share (sliced a number of different ways) and the raw number of users of Firefox.

Lots of people report market share for Firefox — it’s a succinct indicator of momentum in the market and with users, and makes a great headline to report that we’re eating IE’s share worldwide, or have exceeded 30% in Germany, or have tripled our share in China this year. And by any account, our market share everywhere is growing — extremely quickly in places like Spain and China and Brazil, somewhat more moderately in the US and Japan — but growing in every locale around the world.

But let’s go back a step: Mozilla (in all forms, including the Foundation, the Corporation, etc) is a public benefit endeavor, with the primary mission of keeping the Internet open and participatory. So why would we care about market share, something that’s traditionally associated with shall-we-say less mission-oriented motivations? In my view there are at least 3 basic reasons that we care (and probably many more):

  • It’s one indicator for how we’re doing, how people like the products that we offer, and how well we’re communicating. Not the only indicator; not the most important; but a significant indicator, nonetheless.
  • It helps us ask questions that let us support our mission better. Including these (but there are many, many more):
    • Why is our market share so high in Europe compared to the US?
      (50% higher, and more in some countries) Understanding why some countries exhibit higher usage than others can provide pointers to how to build a more relevant product for more users, and how to communicate about the product.
    • Why are so many people in China using the English version of Firefox?
      (as much as 20%) Is it just that people use English for business? Is there some perceived difference? Understanding this can help us make both our Chinese language version better and even potentially our English language version for folks using it in China.
    • Where can we use market share most effectively to help the spread of Web standards? (everywhere but Korea, for the moment)
  • We believe Firefox is a superior product, and so we want as many people as possible to use it, or at least know there’s a choice. While I’m happy that there’s increased innovation in the browser space lately, I think that Firefox has the very best blend of features, extensibility, and simplicity, not to mention the fastest security patching in the industry, by a longshot.

But market share reports have issues. The most basic issue is that there’s no way to really represent the complexity and the dynamism of the global Web — it’s just too big, with too many things changing too rapidly. Different studies have different biases: some are oriented towards early adopters (like W3Schools, who reports Firefox at 36%), some (like XitiMonitor) will bias towards European properties, and currently all studies undercount or neglect usage in Asia, South America and Africa (all admittedly tricky to characterize usage in). Don’t misunderstand: all of these studies are extremely useful and help understand what’s happening around the world. I’m just asserting that it’s very important to understand the limits of particular studies and the assumptions that are baked in.

We also look to data from individual sites to help us understand Firefox usage. Historically we’ve skewed very high on techie sites and early adopter sites — for many Silicon Valley startups Firefox use represents well over half their traffic for a significant part of their early life. Conversely, we’ll tend to see lower-than-average Firefox usage on some of the more mass market populations. It’s been hard for us to share this type of data broadly because of the idiosyncratic nature of what we see, and because most of this type of data is shared with us with the understanding that we’ll not republish. But on the whole, the data that we’re seeing shows Firefox at something like 19-20% worldwide on sites that we consider mainstream.

There’s another, subtler issue here: most of these measures are in page views, not users. (This makes sense, as by and large, the thing that folks are trying to track is market share of web properties, not the applications that you use to get to them.) As hard as it is to get an accurate read on worldwide traffic numbers for Firefox, it’s even harder to figure out the relationship between page views and users. We have some intuitions here, supported by anecdotal evidence, that Firefox users look at more pages and do more searches than typical users, but nothing that I’d actually call science.

So in addition to these indicators, we also use our own systems to get a sense of the number of actual Firefox users there are in the world (using each language version).

At present, we believe there are at least 125,000,000 Firefox users in the world, give or take.

Here’s how we get to that number. Firefox uses a system that we call AUS (Application Update Service) to keep itself up-to-date with security patches & such. Around once a day, Firefox will ping Mozilla servers to see if there’s a new update available, and if there is, it’ll present an option to users to download and install it. (AUS really deserves a longer posting — the ping is non-identifiable, respecting user privacy, and is one of the major reasons that the Firefox user base, as large as it is, is nearly all using the most recent, patched version at any given time.)

We count those pings, categorized by language version of Firefox, so we have a rough indication for any given day about how many instances of Firefox were running. (It’s decidedly rough — part of that is algorithmic, part of it is due to Firefox running in enterprises behind firewalls or other complex topologies, and part of it is usage based, depending on how people start and stop the application.) It’s rough, but it’s close, and we’ve kept track of the numbers over the past couple of years, since we released Firefox 1.5 (the first Firefox that included AUS). We call these Active Daily Users, and it’s a measure of the successful pings in a given day. Here’s a chart of Active Daily Users over the last year, since we released Firefox 2 at the end of October 2006:

Firefox AUS Since FX2

What that says is that averaged over a 7 day period, we’ve gone from 23M Active Daily Users in October 2006 to 42M a couple of weeks ago. (And we actually hit 48.8M yesterday, an all-time high that shows continued strong growth over the last few months.)

To get from the ADU number to our whole worldwide number of users, measured in terms of uniques in a given month, like most every web site does, we multiply ADU by 3. So for a couple of weeks ago, with 42M ADUs, we compute that we have something in excess of 126M unique monthly users.

This is a conservative multiplier (we think it could be more like 3.5) that we’ve gotten to by doing some of our own experiments, piecing together data we’ve received from sites who have done their own calculations, and then really testing them against the best common sense top-down tests we can. Here’s one: take our estimate of monthly users (126M) and divide by the whole number of Internet users in the world (Internet World Stats puts the current at 1.2B)  — you end up with about 10.5%, which is lower than most reports of our global traffic share. You can do a bunch of mental gymnastics from there to account for higher-page-views-than-average for typical Firefox users, an overcounting of usage worldwide, etc — but for our purposes here at Mozilla, we use a multiplier of 3 to approximate the number of worldwide Firefox users.

But, really, the absolute number of users around the world is less important than the trending. Are more people finding their way to Firefox? (yes!) How about in Brazil? (yes again) What happens over holidays? (people don’t use their computers as much — yay!) What happens when we do security updates? (usage goes down as anti-virus software updates get propagated, but recovers over the following week or 2)

Phew. That was a longer post than I thought it would be. More to come on topics like the annual autumn surge in usage, huge growth in China and Spain this year, and others.

107 comments

  1. “What happens when we do security updates? (usage goes down as anti-virus software updates get propagated, but recovers over the following week or 2)”

    Do you mean that anti-virus software is suspicious of the new version of Firefox and prevents it from running or from connecting to the Internet? If so, eep! What percent of Firefox users does that happen to? How long does the effect last? What can we do about it?

  2. hey jesse — actually, we don’t know. what we do know is that in the days following new dot releases, we see a clear decline in usage — 10% or more — and it takes a few days to recover. working theory at the moment is that it takes a while for the anti-virus programs to recognize the new firefox is valid — we don’t really know though, so that’s a good example of a question that tracking the stats raises that we need to figure out.

  3. Great post. Are there other values for multipliers other than 3? If 3 is a conservative multiplier, what is the aggressive multiplier? 3.5? Or, do some think it could be higher? Might be interesting to see the range of total users based on the conservative to aggressive multipliers.

    You also mention that most all websites use a multiplier of 3 to get from ADU to total users. Just interested in learning more about the calculation of this multiplier number. Seems like an interesting calculation to understand more deeply. If you have any others sources that you trust/like and discuss this calculation, please share.

  4. > What happens when we do security updates? (usage goes down as anti-virus software updates get propagated, but recovers over the following week or 2)

    Another consideration is that Firefox does not check for updates after it already has one. This will cause users not to ping until they upgrade. Another conclusion would be that users are clicking “later” and not restarting their browser for a little while.

    What’s really cool about this data, regardless of the total or “multiplier”, is that Firefox use is growing strong.

  5. Judging from support requests on MozillaZine, Internet security software continues to be a big problem. Some of it has some nasty bugs and pitfalls, and I’m not sure there’s any guarantee that this stuff gets updated or fixed. That is, it might be totally up to the user to fix, in which case, much of the damage would be permanent.

    There’s a bug report on this ( https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=33… ) that may help some, if it ever gets fixed. It might also be a good idea to buy some popular Internet security suites and give them a thorough shakedown.

  6. “What happens when we do security updates? (usage goes down as anti-virus software updates get propagated, but recovers over the following week or 2)”

    Do you mean that anti-virus software is suspicious of the new version of Firefox and prevents it from running or from connecting to the Internet? If so, eep! What percent of Firefox users does that happen to? How long does the effect last? What can we do about it?

  7. hey jesse — actually, we don’t know. what we do know is that in the days following new dot releases, we see a clear decline in usage — 10% or more — and it takes a few days to recover. working theory at the moment is that it takes a while for the anti-virus programs to recognize the new firefox is valid — we don’t really know though, so that’s a good example of a question that tracking the stats raises that we need to figure out.

  8. Great post. Are there other values for multipliers other than 3? If 3 is a conservative multiplier, what is the aggressive multiplier? 3.5? Or, do some think it could be higher? Might be interesting to see the range of total users based on the conservative to aggressive multipliers.

    You also mention that most all websites use a multiplier of 3 to get from ADU to total users. Just interested in learning more about the calculation of this multiplier number. Seems like an interesting calculation to understand more deeply. If you have any others sources that you trust/like and discuss this calculation, please share.

  9. > What happens when we do security updates? (usage goes down as anti-virus software updates get propagated, but recovers over the following week or 2)

    Another consideration is that Firefox does not check for updates after it already has one. This will cause users not to ping until they upgrade. Another conclusion would be that users are clicking “later” and not restarting their browser for a little while.

    What’s really cool about this data, regardless of the total or “multiplier”, is that Firefox use is growing strong.

  10. Judging from support requests on MozillaZine, Internet security software continues to be a big problem. Some of it has some nasty bugs and pitfalls, and I’m not sure there’s any guarantee that this stuff gets updated or fixed. That is, it might be totally up to the user to fix, in which case, much of the damage would be permanent.

    There’s a bug report on this ( https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=335289 ) that may help some, if it ever gets fixed. It might also be a good idea to buy some popular Internet security suites and give them a thorough shakedown.

  11. “Why are so many people in China using the English version of Firefox?”
    Ooh, ooh, pick me!
    Theory: because of the Firewall in China, a high percentage of users use proxies (which tend to be in English-speaking countries). Depending on how mozilla.com determines a visitor’s country (and therefore, the proper language version to offer for download), it might offer them the English version. The “Other Systems and Languages” link is not super-prominent, so they take the English version.

  12. “Why are so many people in China using the English version of Firefox?”
    Ooh, ooh, pick me!
    Theory: because of the Firewall in China, a high percentage of users use proxies (which tend to be in English-speaking countries). Depending on how mozilla.com determines a visitor’s country (and therefore, the proper language version to offer for download), it might offer them the English version. The “Other Systems and Languages” link is not super-prominent, so they take the English version.

  13. Also, remember that for people who get Firefox as part of a Linux distribution, automatic update for Firefox itself is disabled. This is because the Linux distribution itself will manage updates, and there is no need for Firefox to also manage updates.

    So, it seems possible that using this methodology, nearly all Linux Firefox users may be uncounted.

  14. my 3 Ubuntu computers all have Firefox with updates arriving from the Ubuntu repositories, not direct, so I am using a recent build but you won’t see me in your stats.

  15. I’m with Alan Bell. Gentoo manages updates the same way. In fact, the “check for firefox updates” is disable in the application so the distro can manage the updates. I bet your numbers are actually much higher than what you’re seeing.

  16. Another Linux user (Fedora), I’m sure your numbers are much higher than what you’re seeing. May want to check with the major distros and see if they have stats on FF users.

  17. hey carl, seth, alan, harley — you’re all exactly right — i should have listed linux distros as a significant factor in the “firefox dark matter” in the world — it exists, but we don’t have ways to see it. linux use certainly accounts for at least single-digit millions every day (and maybe more), but it’s hard to say exactly how many. easier to approximate this number than it is folks using it behind enterprise firewalls, though.

  18. Another couple here. FF on Ubuntu and FF built from source for my “Linux From Scratch” server based boxes. (I turn off automatic updates in the .mozconfig file). So there’s two more here…

  19. Are you saying that behind corporate firewalls you may have several users that get counted as one? If so, my several Linux machines and three Windows machines at home are likely counted as one because of the router. For my home anyway, the multiplier is much greater than 3.

  20. Also, remember that for people who get Firefox as part of a Linux distribution, automatic update for Firefox itself is disabled. This is because the Linux distribution itself will manage updates, and there is no need for Firefox to also manage updates.

    So, it seems possible that using this methodology, nearly all Linux Firefox users may be uncounted.

  21. my 3 Ubuntu computers all have Firefox with updates arriving from the Ubuntu repositories, not direct, so I am using a recent build but you won’t see me in your stats.

  22. I’m with Alan Bell. Gentoo manages updates the same way. In fact, the “check for firefox updates” is disable in the application so the distro can manage the updates. I bet your numbers are actually much higher than what you’re seeing.

  23. Another factor – I (one person) use Firefox at work (part time – internal corporate applications require IE6) as well as on two machines at home. And have at least two users on each of my home machines (one Administrator, one Limited). So – is there a separate AUS ping for each user on the same machine? Then I would probably account for up to 5 or maybe even 6 pings on some days (usually Mondays or Tuesdays when I traditionally check Windows updates.)

    But even if there is not, you would get 3 user pings for one real user.

  24. Another Linux user (Fedora), I’m sure your numbers are much higher than what you’re seeing. May want to check with the major distros and see if they have stats on FF users.

  25. The ping hit is a minimum number. I don’t want my software to talk to the world without my knowledge. Updates get queried and installed at ***MY*** request, and then only after I let the query through my firewall!

    Further, how do you count where Firefox is installed on both a Windows and a Linux partition? Is that one or two installs?

    Personally I would count it as two.

  26. I know some users who freak out whenever any security update comes, and stay off the Internet entirely until “the shakes start” – frequently around a week or so. On at least one of my computers, I only do updates if either I’m at a convenient point to close all of my windows * tabs, or I need to go to an untrusted site. On another computer, I only run updates that fix problems that would affect me (javascript bug? That computer doesn’t have javascript enabled, so no biggie.)

    I’d suspect that the firewall thing you mention is actually specific to proxying firewalls, which could cache the presence of an update, and therefore each actual ping you get could be one user or 10,000 users. However, most home firewalls, being simple packet filters, would have no impact.

  27. John,
    The difficulty in measuring market share of open source applications is one the OpenOffice.org, each Linux distro, and many other communities have grappled with. If you were to generalize Mozilla’s experience to create a strategy paper for other projects to follow, what would it look like? Is there a chance Mozilla would be interesting in participating with some other projects to develop their own capabilities similar to yours?

    -Ben

  28. hey carl, seth, alan, harley — you’re all exactly right — i should have listed linux distros as a significant factor in the “firefox dark matter” in the world — it exists, but we don’t have ways to see it. linux use certainly accounts for at least single-digit millions every day (and maybe more), but it’s hard to say exactly how many. easier to approximate this number than it is folks using it behind enterprise firewalls, though.

  29. Another couple here. FF on Ubuntu and FF built from source for my “Linux From Scratch” server based boxes. (I turn off automatic updates in the .mozconfig file). So there’s two more here…

  30. Same with Debian, automatic updates of Iceweasel are disabled and handled via package managers. And as Firefox is the standard browser in all but a few Linux distros, you’re probably missing a few million of us.

    It might be a good method to count windows and mac users based on how many times a given update, say e.g. 2.0.0.8 has been downloaded. How do these compare to the update ping numbers?

  31. Are you saying that behind corporate firewalls you may have several users that get counted as one? If so, my several Linux machines and three Windows machines at home are likely counted as one because of the router. For my home anyway, the multiplier is much greater than 3.

  32. Another factor – I (one person) use Firefox at work (part time – internal corporate applications require IE6) as well as on two machines at home. And have at least two users on each of my home machines (one Administrator, one Limited). So – is there a separate AUS ping for each user on the same machine? Then I would probably account for up to 5 or maybe even 6 pings on some days (usually Mondays or Tuesdays when I traditionally check Windows updates.)

    But even if there is not, you would get 3 user pings for one real user.

  33. The ping hit is a minimum number. I don’t want my software to talk to the world without my knowledge. Updates get queried and installed at ***MY*** request, and then only after I let the query through my firewall!

    Further, how do you count where Firefox is installed on both a Windows and a Linux partition? Is that one or two installs?

    Personally I would count it as two.

  34. I know some users who freak out whenever any security update comes, and stay off the Internet entirely until “the shakes start” – frequently around a week or so. On at least one of my computers, I only do updates if either I’m at a convenient point to close all of my windows * tabs, or I need to go to an untrusted site. On another computer, I only run updates that fix problems that would affect me (javascript bug? That computer doesn’t have javascript enabled, so no biggie.)

    I’d suspect that the firewall thing you mention is actually specific to proxying firewalls, which could cache the presence of an update, and therefore each actual ping you get could be one user or 10,000 users. However, most home firewalls, being simple packet filters, would have no impact.

  35. John,
    The difficulty in measuring market share of open source applications is one the OpenOffice.org, each Linux distro, and many other communities have grappled with. If you were to generalize Mozilla’s experience to create a strategy paper for other projects to follow, what would it look like? Is there a chance Mozilla would be interesting in participating with some other projects to develop their own capabilities similar to yours?

    -Ben

  36. Same with Debian, automatic updates of Iceweasel are disabled and handled via package managers. And as Firefox is the standard browser in all but a few Linux distros, you’re probably missing a few million of us.

    It might be a good method to count windows and mac users based on how many times a given update, say e.g. 2.0.0.8 has been downloaded. How do these compare to the update ping numbers?

  37. If we lose 10% of users temporarily with each update, it wouldn’t be at all surprising if we lost 1% permanently with each update. That’s a lot, but you would probably never notice from ping statistics.

    We see a lot of users on the support forum who claim that they have configured/turned off/uninstalled their firewall, so it couldn’t be a firewall problem. With sufficient persuasion most of these users eventually fix their firewall and eat their words, but that level of support is impossible for the vast majority of users. It might be a good idea to devote some resources to this problem.

  38. If we lose 10% of users temporarily with each update, it wouldn’t be at all surprising if we lost 1% permanently with each update. That’s a lot, but you would probably never notice from ping statistics.

    We see a lot of users on the support forum who claim that they have configured/turned off/uninstalled their firewall, so it couldn’t be a firewall problem. With sufficient persuasion most of these users eventually fix their firewall and eat their words, but that level of support is impossible for the vast majority of users. It might be a good idea to devote some resources to this problem.

  39. 125,000,000 de usuarios de Internet utilizan Firefox [EN]…

    Recogiendo informacion de diferentes fuentes, el autor concluye que en el mundo hay ya mas de 125.000.000 de usuarios de Mozilla Firefox. Destaca el uso del navegador en Europa, donde en algunos casos tiene una cuota de mercado por encima del 50% ….

  40. 125,000,000 de usuarios de Internet utilizan Firefox [EN]…

    Este post fue agregado a teknear.com para votarlo. Votalo!…

  41. Now if you apply either $1, $4, or $40+ per user per year, that $80MM a year is kinda chump change.

    Nice problem to have though.

    Ask Adobe or Emmy for total number of Web users. They’re within 5-10% of having every user on the web world-wide. They had been public about the numbers in the past.

  42. Now if you apply either $1, $4, or $40+ per user per year, that $80MM a year is kinda chump change.

    Nice problem to have though.

    Ask Adobe or Emmy for total number of Web users. They’re within 5-10% of having every user on the web world-wide. They had been public about the numbers in the past.

  43. I think a lot of people are getting distracted with the nitty gritty details of converting the pings into absolute number of users. Yes, MoCo has no magical way of doing an absolute conversion from software update pings, to ADU, to users.

    I do appreciate John providing so many details into how the .125 billion figure was calculated; however, the real news is that the software update pings have doubled relatively quickly. I think it’s safe to assume that this is roughly proportional to ADU over the span of this measurement.

    Double is double, regardless of the exact number you’re doubling.

  44. I think a lot of people are getting distracted with the nitty gritty details of converting the pings into absolute number of users. Yes, MoCo has no magical way of doing an absolute conversion from software update pings, to ADU, to users.

    I do appreciate John providing so many details into how the .125 billion figure was calculated; however, the real news is that the software update pings have doubled relatively quickly. I think it’s safe to assume that this is roughly proportional to ADU over the span of this measurement.

    Double is double, regardless of the exact number you’re doubling.

  45. I wonder why MoCo isn’t comparing the IP numbers used for downloads (for installations) with the IP numbers used for updates???

  46. I wonder why MoCo isn’t comparing the IP numbers used for downloads (for installations) with the IP numbers used for updates???

  47. Firefox comes with a default live bookmark that points to the BBC News RSS feed.

    Have you asked bbc.co.uk what are the usage stats they receive?

  48. Firefox comes with a default live bookmark that points to the BBC News RSS feed.

    Have you asked bbc.co.uk what are the usage stats they receive?

  49. Mozilla COO: over 125 million people use Firefox…

    Mozilla COO John Lilly has revealed statistical data that provides insight into Firefox adoption levels and growth rate. Based on statistics collected internally by Mozilla from the Firefox application update service, Lilly estimates that Firefox is us…

  50. Dear webmaster,

    I am in Bangkok and study in IT so I was assigned to find the open source. Then I thought that Firefox is interested for presentation. And I think I would like to present the statistic of download of Firefox. However, I don’t have data for compare with other browser , so would you please get the statistic of download of Firefox to me?.

    Best Regard
    Jay

  51. Dear webmaster,

    I am in Bangkok and study in IT so I was assigned to find the open source. Then I thought that Firefox is interested for presentation. And I think I would like to present the statistic of download of Firefox. However, I don’t have data for compare with other browser , so would you please get the statistic of download of Firefox to me?.

    Best Regard
    Jay

  52. Perhaps I overlooked it in the article and the comments, but are there also any rough statistics, among the Firefox downloads and/or the usage patterns of how many Firefox users are on the various platforms that are supported: UNIX, Linux, BSD, Windows… ?

  53. Perhaps I overlooked it in the article and the comments, but are there also any rough statistics, among the Firefox downloads and/or the usage patterns of how many Firefox users are on the various platforms that are supported: UNIX, Linux, BSD, Windows… ?

  54. Simple. My firewall (McAffe) will block any unknown program from accessing the net without my permission. I had to turn on the warnings, otherwise they are silent.
    It mesures a ‘safe app’ by checking the md5sum against it’s allowed database. (big!)
    It takes a day for someone to accept the new checksum, and add it to the database, and another day for all users to have downloaded the new database. that accounts for two or three days of blocked firefox after every update!

  55. Simple. My firewall (McAffe) will block any unknown program from accessing the net without my permission. I had to turn on the warnings, otherwise they are silent.
    It mesures a ‘safe app’ by checking the md5sum against it’s allowed database. (big!)
    It takes a day for someone to accept the new checksum, and add it to the database, and another day for all users to have downloaded the new database. that accounts for two or three days of blocked firefox after every update!

  56. work online at home…

    I know how you feel. I would have to say i have spent more money than i would love to admit on some of these home- based business programs. I also happen to believe that money doesn’ t just fall in one’ s lap, though. Anything worth having is worth…

  57. OMG, there’s already 5 trackback from Indonesian blog here, most of them mention that Firefox users is half the
    Indonesian population.

    “Why are so many people in China using the English version of Firefox?”
    In Indonesian, all users are using en-US version, mainly because it’s just right on your face when you go to the download page. None are complaining, since we’re already using with English Windows, and (most?) of them is pirated version.

    Internet bandwidth is still expensive for the most of us, not counting limited International bandwidth, but I guess most of the ‘techies’ and bloggers are using Firefox. Recently, I asked the stats from a big forum and Firefox is already surpassed 50%. There is stats from a 6 month old Indonesian blogging service that speaks the same.

  58. OMG, there’s already 5 trackback from Indonesian blog here, most of them mention that Firefox users is half the
    Indonesian population.

    “Why are so many people in China using the English version of Firefox?”
    In Indonesian, all users are using en-US version, mainly because it’s just right on your face when you go to the download page. None are complaining, since we’re already using with English Windows, and (most?) of them is pirated version.

    Internet bandwidth is still expensive for the most of us, not counting limited International bandwidth, but I guess most of the ‘techies’ and bloggers are using Firefox. Recently, I asked the stats from a big forum and Firefox is already surpassed 50%. There is stats from a 6 month old Indonesian blogging service that speaks the same.

  59. Bruce A. Wittmeier

    My hat goes off to the Mozilla team. It wasnt enough that MS couldnt compete on a level playing field and began giving away the browser, but then to attempt to integrate it into the O/S was beyond belief.

    The stamina and professionalism of the Mozilla team deserves an award for perseverance and development of a superior product.

    Bruce

  60. My hat goes off to the Mozilla team. It wasnt enough that MS couldnt compete on a level playing field and began giving away the browser, but then to attempt to integrate it into the O/S was beyond belief.

    The stamina and professionalism of the Mozilla team deserves an award for perseverance and development of a superior product.

    Bruce

  61. Why does market share effectively help the spread of Web standards everywhere but Korea?
    Why not Korea? (Presumably you mean South Korea). Is it:
    - because FF has NO market share there?
    - because FF owns the market there?
    - something else?

  62. Ah — I said that we're effective at it everywhere but [South] Korea (and presumably North, too, but that's not really what i meant.)

    In South Korea, there are some government regulations & crypto techs that are used by the government that require ActiveX implementations, and so it's been very very hard for us to get any significant traction — as a result , it's harder for us to spread the OpenWeb message.

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